Category Archives: 2016

Death, Dying and End of Life Issues | by Ajahn Brahm

Death is inevitable.
Rather than fear or ignore our impending demise, it is critical that we plan the inevitable well ahead of time.
This gives us focus and urgency, leading to a good life. And eventually a good death.
In this talk given at The Buddhist Society of Victoria, Ajahn Brahm shares how to handle dying with Buddhist wisdom. This will empower you with the right perspective to handle end of life matters – when they happen to you and loved ones.

A Different Perspective On Empathy | by Ajahn Brahm


Being empathetic is generally considered to be a positive in modern society, and within Buddhism. But Ajahn Brahm takes a different perspective on empathy, pointing out that often our empathy is directed to the negative feelings of others. There is a time and place for this, but we need to keep this in balance and also take some time to get some space away from the world to find calm and stability within.

A Different Perspective on Empathy | by Ajahn Brahm


Being empathetic is generally considered to be a positive in modern society, and within Buddhism. But Ajahn Brahm takes a different perspective on empathy, pointing out that often our empathy is directed to the negative feelings of others. There is a time and place for this, but we need to keep this in balance and also take some time to get some space away from the world to find calm and stability within.

Courage | by Ajahn Brahm


Ajahn Brahm reinterprets the Buddhist principle of “viriya” – often interpreted within Buddhist schools as being “energy” or “effort” – by point out that the root of the work “vira” means “hero”, and that we can interpret “viriya” (which is one of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment”) as “heroism” or “courage”. It’s this attitude of courage that can help us to face and overcome many of life’s challenges.

Courage | by Ajahn Brahm


Ajahn Brahm reinterprets the Buddhist principle of “viriya” – often interpreted within Buddhist schools as being “energy” or “effort” – by point out that the root of the work “vira” means “hero”, and that we can interpret “viriya” (which is one of the Seven Factors of Enlightenment”) as “heroism” or “courage”. It’s this attitude of courage that can help us to face and overcome many of life’s challenges.